February 12th, 2014

bellechere:

kellysue:

everybodyilovedies:

towritelesbiansonherarms:

everybodyilovedies:

FAQ #1, for the anon who asked about it a while ago. Part I of a series, which means mORE TO COME. Like comics, I am so organized i SEEM DISORGANIZED???

Ultimate Marvel universe is 1610

JUST SAYIN’!

but good work.

this will help the newbies.

YES I KNOW someone already pointed that out DDXX i SWEAR I DOUBLE-CHECKED THAT IDK WHAT’S WRONG WITH MY BRAIN.

Yes, I know I already reblogged the links to these but I’m reblogging them separately too and YOU CAN’T STOP ME. 

Here, have another

Now what would you pay

But WAIT — there’s MOAR

The first time entering a comic book store, I was intimidated. It wasn’t due to an unpleasant owner, or patrons that made me leery - it was due to the volume of volumes. I’m the type of person who neeeeeeds to start with #1, and felt a little embarrassed asking for help and admitting to being lost to the shop owner or my then-boyfriend. This was very well put!

How To Do Comics: Organizing | by everybodyilovedies

February 11th, 2014

Continuing the comic shop discussion from yesterday, this is Rachel Edidin’s thoughtful & insightful views on the subject. 

postcardsfromspace: This comic by Noelle Stevenson has been making the tumblr rounds, and it’s gotten me thinking about my own comics shop experiences—one, in particular.

My comics shop—the comics shop I’ve continued to think of as my comics shop, even years after I moved cross-country and it closed down (no connection, I promise)—is The Sword & The Grail, a little hole-in-the-wall comics and gaming shop tucked next to Mast General Store in downtown Asheville, North Carolina.

S&G wasn’t my first comics shop, but it was the first I where I had a pull list—and the first where I became a capital-R regular. It didn’t introduce me to comics or gaming, but it did get me invested in the community around them, because it was the first place I’d found a comics and gaming community outside of my small circle of friends that seemed worth investing in.

The owner, Alex, was an ex-military guy who’d worked as a hairstylist before deciding to open S&G. He loved comics and loved gaming and loved helping other people find comics and games to love. He also occasionally fixed my bangs after I’d trimmed them with office scissors, which is not entirely the point, except to say that a) I trusted that dude implicitly, and b) it was the kind of shop where that stuff happened. His wife worked at the salon across the street and hung out at the shop, and she was into comics and gaming, too, but more casually; and that meant a lot, too, because it underlined the fact that S&G wasn’t just for people who could get through the lightning round of big-two trivia: it was for anyone who cared enough to be there.

Which is part of why S&G was the first place where I felt comfortable enough to be a relative novice, someone who loved comics but didn’t yet know much about them. Before, I’d explored on my own, almost at random; or read the things that other people thrust at me. At S&G, I suddenly had a much wider network of friends who cared enough to learn what I liked and help me find more of it; who were eager to share what they loved and tell me why they loved it. S&G is where I started buying superhero comics on the regular, but it’s also where I learned the names of independent creators like Ted Naifeh.

As a rule, S&G had a zero-tolerance asshole policy: if you were harassing or intimidating other customers, you would be called out on it, and if you kept it up, you would be asked to leave. It was the comics shop where the girls I knew hung out, because it was the one where we knew if anyone got aggressive—socially, not even physically—the staff and most of the patrons would have our backs. It was a store that was overtly and deliberately female-friendly, kid-friendly, and newcomer-friendly—something I’d never really seen in a comics shop before. Being a regular meant occasional dibs on new books, getting to stay after hours to finish a session. In terms of other customers, it meant trust to be a good ambassador: to recommend books, or sit by new kids during games.

I live across the country now, in Portland, Oregon, a city full of diverse, welcoming, wonderful comics shops. But I owe Sword & Grail the standard by which I measure them, as well as a fair part of my decision to pursue a career in the industry.

It’s also why I have no patience for hostile comics and game shops staffed with elitist, self-deputized gatekeepers; or for fans who insist that the alternative is a feel-good pipe dream. It’s not. The future of comics and gaming shops is S&G. It’s Bridge City, Floating World, TFAW, and Guardian Games. It’s Happy Harbor, Strange Adventures, and Bergen Street, and dozens and dozens of others. Those shitty, sexist, dank-cave comics shops are a dying breed: gradually, they will put themselves out of business as the narrow, angry demographic to which they cater drives itself further and further into the margins. The new standard will be—is—well lit, and friendly, and inclusive: the kinds of shops that can take a shy college kid on the fringes and make her want to dive head-first into their worlds and never, ever come up for air.

A Comic About Comic Shops | by Noelle Stevenson (gingerhaze)

gingerhaze: Oh, I know I have it better than a lot of would-be comics buyers, and that’s what worries me. I’ve had it with the self-appointed gatekeepers in comics. 

This seems to be the topic of the day, and since Miss Stevenson’s hopes the the comic will spark discussion, I want to give my two cents.

At some point, I have been one of those exclusionary asshole gatekeepers. I’ve used my knowledge about geek culture & trivia to feel superior over other geeks. Or, in context of this comic, to try to impress “geek girls”. Because nothing is more appealing than being a fucking know-it-all. AMIRITE, LADIES?

Fortunately, when I’m being that asshole, I have friends that tell me so. I’ll reflect on my behavior, and change as best I can. I don’t always succeed. Sometimes I fall back into the “I know more about comics than you do” in conversations with friends. Or worse, with my girlfriend, WHO MANAGES A COMIC BOOK SHOP.

The problem with doing things that make you feel superior is that it means you’re actively engaging in behavior designed to make others feel inferior. My point is that I keep on trying, because to do otherwise feels like I’m actively making the world a worse place to be instead of a better place.

Being a gatekeeper isn’t about keeping people out, it’s about welcoming them in.

December 5th, 2012
Being a Hero is Just Another Job | Fandom Wanderers
By Z. McAspurren — Even if you don’t have the extreme knowledge that some can claim to, you’ll likely be aware that there is more than just a couple of comics out there in the world. There’s a whole mass of them, spanning a wide variety of genres. Now, you’ll likely have heard of the big companies: Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, Zenoscope, Image… these are all big names in the industry, and all produce works which get far more reviews per issue than some ought, to be perfectly frank about the matter. So what about the smaller companies? The ‘indie’ ones? Well, that’s where we’re going to be looking today, Wanderers, at a sadly little known comic called Hero: 9 to 5.
Now, to be fair, by little known, I am talking in comic terms. And I feel like I’m doing a great disrespect to the work by using the term. You see, Hero: 9 to 5 is one of the cleverest comics I’ve read in a long while, and I pretty much almost gave up on the whole genre for a while due to being sick of various representations (or lack thereof) and less than stellar writing. That’s not to say there isn’t brilliant stuff out there, because there is. It’s just finding it.
Hero: 9 to 5 was one of those finds
(Read More)

{via iandsharman}

Being a Hero is Just Another Job | Fandom Wanderers

By Z. McAspurren — Even if you don’t have the extreme knowledge that some can claim to, you’ll likely be aware that there is more than just a couple of comics out there in the world. There’s a whole mass of them, spanning a wide variety of genres. Now, you’ll likely have heard of the big companies: Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, Zenoscope, Image… these are all big names in the industry, and all produce works which get far more reviews per issue than some ought, to be perfectly frank about the matter. So what about the smaller companies? The ‘indie’ ones? Well, that’s where we’re going to be looking today, Wanderers, at a sadly little known comic called Hero: 9 to 5.

Now, to be fair, by little known, I am talking in comic terms. And I feel like I’m doing a great disrespect to the work by using the term. You see, Hero: 9 to 5 is one of the cleverest comics I’ve read in a long while, and I pretty much almost gave up on the whole genre for a while due to being sick of various representations (or lack thereof) and less than stellar writing. That’s not to say there isn’t brilliant stuff out there, because there is. It’s just finding it.

Hero: 9 to 5 was one of those finds

(Read More)

{via iandsharman}

(Source: scottishdreamergirl, via iandsharman)

November 21st, 2012
unused Knives Chau drawing | by Bryan Lee O’Malley (radiomaru)

unused Knives Chau drawing | by Bryan Lee O’Malley (radiomaru)

November 14th, 2012

By Bryan Lee O’Malley (radiomaru)

A nice person teaching at CalArts did an anatomy lesson and included examples from me and Meredith Gran and others.

See, I … I know what i’m… i’m … doing….

http://stulivingston.blogspot.com/2012/10/life-drawing-for-animation-demoz.html

November 3rd, 2012
October 20th, 2012

Comic Book Covers by Rafael Grampa

{via andrewmaclean}

(Source: ryley-stbatman, via thechrishaley)

October 15th, 2012
"So You’re Going Through a Breakup" | by Kate Leth (kateordie)
kateordie: "I have a thousand things I could say about making this comic, but instead: Here’s a comic about feelings!"

"So You’re Going Through a Breakup" | by Kate Leth (kateordie)

kateordie: "I have a thousand things I could say about making this comic, but instead: Here’s a comic about feelings!"
October 11th, 2012
MADMAN: Do the Yo-Yo! | by Gilles Vranckx (Blog)

{via lulubonanza}

MADMAN: Do the Yo-Yo! | by Gilles Vranckx (Blog)

{via lulubonanza}

By Evan “Doc” Shaner (docshaner):

"Because I don’t know if I’m going to get a chance to finish it (at least not anytime soon) here are the pencils/partial inks of my Animal Man piece for last week’s Comic Twart theme. Animals!"

By Evan “Doc” Shaner (docshaner):

"Because I don’t know if I’m going to get a chance to finish it (at least not anytime soon) here are the pencils/partial inks of my Animal Man piece for last week’s Comic Twart theme. Animals!"

October 10th, 2012
SNAKE EYES VS STORM SHADOW. FIGHT! | by Dan Hipp (mrhipp)

SNAKE EYES VS STORM SHADOW. FIGHT! | by Dan Hipp (mrhipp)

MADMAN | by Daniel Krall (danielkrall)

"This is a piece I did for Mike Allred’s “Madman 20th Anniversary Monster” book which is out now and packed to the gills with awesome art by Mike himself and a cavalcade of comics heavyweights! I was beyond lucky to be included! I already posted this on my portfolio site a while back, but seeing it on the shelves printed gigantically made me want to share it again! If you haven’t read Madman already, check it out! If you have, run out and get yourself a copy of this giant glossy comic art treasure-chest!”

MADMAN | by Daniel Krall (danielkrall)

"This is a piece I did for Mike Allred’s “Madman 20th Anniversary Monster” book which is out now and packed to the gills with awesome art by Mike himself and a cavalcade of comics heavyweights! I was beyond lucky to be included! I already posted this on my portfolio site a while back, but seeing it on the shelves printed gigantically made me want to share it again! If you haven’t read Madman already, check it out! If you have, run out and get yourself a copy of this giant glossy comic art treasure-chest!”

Do The Math series | by Matt Cowan » All designs available in shirt flavor at mjcTees.

{via timetravelandrocketpoweredapes}